Truck Accident Statistics

In 2003, there were 58,512 total vehicle accidents involved in fatal crashes in the U.S. (NCSA).

4,669 were large trucks involved in fatal truck accidents.

Large trucks are more likely to be involved in a fatal multi-vehicle crash than are passenger vehicles.

Most fatal truck accidents occurred in rural areas (68 percent) during the daytime (66 percent) and on weekdays (78 percent).

Only 1 percent of fatal truck accidents were DUI-related on the part of the truck driver compared to other types of fatal crashes. Higher DUI occurrences are 22 percent for drivers of passenger vehicles and light trucks and 29 percent for motorcyclists.

About 27 percent of all large truck drivers involved in fatal truck accidents had at least one prior speeding conviction compared to 19 percent of the passenger vehicle drivers involved in fatal crashes.

California had the most with 5,725 total fatal vehicle crashes but Texas had the most fatal truck accidents with 438.

Here’s a breakdown of the top 5 states as to fatal truck accidents in 2003:

State
Total Fatal Vehicle Crashes
Fatal Truck Accidents
California
5,725
332
Texas
5,040
438
Florida
4,432
343
Georgia
2,277
208
Pennsylvania
2,233
213

Compared to a breakdown of the top 5 states as to fatal truck accidents in 2002:

State Total
Fatal Vehicle Crashes
Fatal Truck Accidents
California
5,544
346
Texas
5,039
401
Florida
4,431
351
Pennsylvania
2,198
174
Georgia
2,188
202

More truck accident statistics from FARS (Fatality Analysis Reporting System)

Large trucks accounted for 9 percent of the vehicles in fatal crashes, but only 4 percent of the vehicles involved in injury and property-damage-only crashes. Of the 4,898 large trucks involved in fatal crashes, 76 percent were combination trucks.

Regardless of crash severity, the majority of vehicles in single and two-vehicle crashes were going straight prior to the crash.

The majority of persons killed or injured in traffic crashes were drivers (65 percent), followed by passengers (31 percent), pedestrians (3 percent), and pedal cyclists (2 percent).

In 2003, the initial point of impact at time of collision happened 2,354 times (50 percent) in the front of vehicle; compared to 382 times on the left side, 188 times on the right side, and 720 times in the rear.

In 2003, 608 large trucks were involved in fatal truck accidents causes by rollovers.

Miscellaneous trucking revenue statistics

The truck driver makes 30.3 cents per mile. Average yearly income for a driver is $32,000 a year. The average owner operator makes slightly more.

Total revenue estimates are $255.5 billion. For hire or common carriers trucking companies generated revenue estimated at $97.9 billion about $18 billion more than air transportation. Private fleets generated revenue estimated at $121 billion.

Truck operating ratio is estimated at 95.2. This means for every dollar in revenue the trucking company has a cost of 95.2 cents leaving a profit of 4.8 cents on every dollar.

The trucking industry contributes an estimate of $21.4 billion to operate on U.S. roads and highways.

The trucking industry accounts for 12.8 percent of all the fuel purchased in the U.S. Automobiles and light vehicles account for 63 percent of fuel purchases.

About the Author

Michael Monheit, Esquire is the managing attorney for Monheit Law, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Monheit Law, P.C. concentrates its practice in the field of plaintiff personal injury cases on a contingency fee basis. They can be found at http://www.monheit.com/truck

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Truck Accident Statistics

In 2003, there were 58,512 total vehicle accidents involved in fatal crashes in the U.S. (NCSA).

4,669 were large trucks involved in fatal truck accidents.

Large trucks are more likely to be involved in a fatal multi-vehicle crash than are ...

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